The meaning of “pretty”

Pretty

Adjective: attractive in a delicate way without being beautiful.

ej: Will I be pretty when I grow up mommy?

Adverb: To a moderately high degree. (synonyms – quite, rather, enough, fairly, plenty, sufficiently)

ej: He looks pretty good for his age.

What defines our idea of “pretty?”

Are there specific characteristics that most all societies deem pretty? For example, big eyes?

Are there characteristics that, based on the society we live in, are considered ugly?

How are WE defined by the use of this word?

Watch the video below and see how one woman views this word. Do you agree?

http://www.upworthy.com/this-womans-beef-with-prettiness-will-leave-you-speechless?g=4

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What did you do?

The verb “do” presents tons of problems for the majority of new English speakers, but, in fact, it is easy to learn, if done properly.

In Spanish we have 1 verb (hacer) to say what in English is divided between 2 words: Make and Do. The difference between the two are the following:

Make is something that needs constructing of involves a process: 

Make a cake, make your bed, make a cup of coffee, etc.

Do is used for activities or daily chores:

Do your hair, do the dishes, do exercise, etc.

There are also a large amount of phrases that are set using do and make. You can see those here.

aprender-ingles-rosario

But that is not the confusing part. That we understand. The part that confuses us is when the verb do is used as an auxiliary verb.

A WHAT!

An auxiliary verb is a verb used to give support to another verb. We could call it a helper verb. The helper verb used to ask questions and make negative responses is do.

Do you want to go dancing tonight?

or we can use it in the past form:

Did you go dancing last night?

Do you like coffee?

No, I do not like coffee (No I don’t like coffee)

Take a look at the structure below.

Did

you

eat

pizza

yesterday?

Auxiliary verb

Subject pronoun

Verb

noun

adverb

 

So, you can never ever ever ever never say:

Know you him?

Firstly because there is no auxiliary word that makes it a questions.

Secondly because the pronoun is out of order

The correct way to ask the question is:

Do you know him?

Take note

When you ask a questions using do in the past, you will use did, in which case, the verb will be in present simple tense.

Did you do the dishes?

If the answer is a negative response you will use the same structure

No, I did not do the dishes.

If the answer is a positive response, the verb will conjugate into the simple past tense.

Yes, I did the dishes (no auxiliary verb)

A fun way to practice this is by asking your friends what they did last night and taking turns answering the questions.

  • Did you drink wine last night?
  • Did you eat in a restaurant last night?
  • Did you sleep in your bed last night?
  • Did you call your mother last night?
  • Did you make a cake last night?

Is it ever too late?

 An 87 Year Old College Student Named Rose

The first day of school our professor introduced himself and challenged us to get to know someone we didn’t already know.  I stood up to look around when a gentle hand touched my shoulder. I turned round to find a wrinkled, little old lady beaming up at me with a smile that lit up her entire being.  She said, “Hi handsome. My name is Rose. I’m eighty-seven years old. Can I give you a hug?”  I laughed and enthusiastically responded, “Of course you may!” and she gave me a giant squeeze.  “Why are you in college at such a young, innocent age?” I asked.

She jokingly replied, “I’m here to meet a rich husband, get married, and have a couple of kids…”
“No seriously,” I asked. I was curious what may have motivated her to be taking on this challenge at her age.  “I always dreamed of having a college education and now I’m getting one!” she told me.  After class we walked to the student union building and shared a chocolate milkshake. We became instant friends. Every day for the next three months, we would leave class together and talk nonstop. I was always mesmerized listening to this “time machine” as she shared her wisdom and experience with me.  Over the course of the year, Rose became a campus icon and she easily made friends wherever she went. She loved to dress up and she reveled in the attention bestowed upon her from the other students. She was living it up.
At the end of the semester we invited Rose to speak at our football banquet. I’ll never forget what she taught us. She was introduced and stepped up to the podium.
As she began to deliver her prepared speech, she dropped her three by five cards on the floor. Frustrated and a little embarrassed she leaned into the microphone and simply said, “I’m sorry I’m so jittery. I gave up beer for Lent and this whiskey is killing me! I’ll never get my speech back in order so let me just tell you what I know.”
As we laughed she cleared her throat and began, “We do not stop playing because we are old; we grow old because we stop playing. There are only four secrets to staying young, being happy, and achieving success. You have to laugh and find humor every day.  You’ve got to have a dream. When you lose your dreams, you die.  We have so many people walking around who are dead and don’t even know it!  There is a huge difference between growing older and growing up.
If you are nineteen years old and lie in bed for one full year and don’t do one productive thing, you will turn twenty years old.  If I am eighty-seven years old and stay in bed for a year and never do anything I will turn eighty-eight.  Anybody can grow older. That doesn’t take any talent or ability. The idea is to grow up by always finding opportunity in change.  Have no regrets.
The elderly usually don’t have regrets for what we did, but rather for things we did not do. The only people who fear death are those with regrets.”  She concluded her speech by courageously singing “The Rose.” She challenged each of us to study the lyrics and live them out in our daily lives.  At the year’s end Rose finished the college degree she had begun all those years ago. One week after graduation Rose died peacefully in her sleep.  Over two thousand college students attended her funeral in tribute to the wonderful woman who taught by example that it’s
never too late to be all you can possibly be.

REMEMBER, GROWING OLDER IS MANDATORY. GROWING UP IS OPTIONAL.

We make a Living by what we get. We make a Life by what we give.

  1. What is the difference between “growing older” and “growing up”?
  2. Is there anything you will regret NOT doing if you were to die tomorrow?
  3. What have you always wanted to do or learn?
  4. According to Rose, what are the 4 secrets to staying young, being happy, and achieving success?

Validation

This is one of the best shorts I have ever seen! It gives true meaning to the idea of a smile being contagious.

  • What are the two meanings for the word: validation?
  • What is the message of the video?
  • What happens to the man that works at the parking garage?
  • When is the last time you complimented someone you did not know?

Mas Amor Por Favor

Today we talked about social movements. What they are, how they are started and how to start on of our own.

Here is an amazing video about starting a social movement and the importance of followers rather than leaders.

 

 

If you feel inspired to follow me in the social movement I put into motion last week here is how you can do so:

Each Sunday, sit down, make 7 cards with phrases on them.

The phrases should be inspirational and come from the love inside you.

Then, as you walk through your day, be present. Pay attention.

When you see someone that looks like they could use some love, give them a card.

Smile.

And walk away, knowing, you just made their day a little better.

Here are some examples of cards I have made.

mas amor por favor

Also, if you need inspiration for quotes and phrases, just let me know!!!

Make and Do

Oh my oh my, make and do, what a problem! But why? It seems to me that the problem lies with the fact that, first, the verb hacer, is completely over used in the Spanish language, and, secondly, because in English we have two words for hacer instead of one.

Hopefully this will clear up any confusion you might have, beginning with:

Fixed Expressions with ‘Do’

  • do homework
  • do the dishes
  • do housework
  • do good
  • do harm
  • do your best
  • do a favor
  • do 50 mph
  • do business
  • do your duty
  • do your hair
  • do a deed
  • do penance / time
  • do right / wrong
  • do enough

Fixed Expressions with ‘Make’

Here are the some of the most common fixed expressions with ‘make’:

  • make an offer
  • make an exception
  • make a mistake
  • make peace / war
  • make love
  • make money / a profit
  • make a phone call
  • make an effort / attempt
  • make (a) noise
  • make a suggestion
  • make a decision
  • make an excuse
  • make progress
  • make arrangements

General Rules for ‘Do’

Use ‘do’ when speaking about vague, or indefinite activities. These include speaking in general using ‘-thing’ words such as something, anything, nothing, etc.

Examples

Are you going to do anything about it?
Let’s do something this afternoon.
I didn’t do anything wrong!

Use ‘do’ for activities. This includes any chores or daily tasks.

Examples

Hurry up and do the dishes
Did you do your chores?
I didn’t have time to do my homework

Use ‘do’ with various jobs and activities ending in ‘-ing’ such as do some gardening, do some thinking, do some painting, etc. This use tends to be informal in nature and can often be stated in a different manner. For example, ‘I did some studying this afternoon’ can be stated ‘I studied this afternoon’.

Examples

I did some thinking about your problem.
He did some reading this morning.
She’s going to do some resting on vacation.

General Rules for ‘Make’

Generally, use ‘make’ when actually constructing or creating something (in other words, NOT for activities).

Examples

I made a cup of tea for breakfast.
He made his daughter a rocking horse.
Did you make that wonderful bread?